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mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement. certainly within israel and the political circles that i've been speaking to, at least. it's something that mr. barak says that he wants to do for a long time but the recent operation by israeli forces in gaza delayed his announcement to do that. something he says he's been planning to do for a long time. this is a figure, as you mention, who's been in public office and public service for his entire
said president mohamed morsi. clearly he felt that his position was greatly strengthened by brokering this peace deal between israel and hamas in gaza. but i think he's overplayed his hand. you just showed that video of the protests there in cairo. we'll have to see where this goes. the great fear is that the muslim brotherhood, like other fascist organizations, will be one man, one vote, one time. and we've seen the muslim blo brotherhood move very swift tloi consolidate their power. >> the u.s. stood squarely behind israel throughout this conflict. does that quiet any critics who thought president obama was soft on israeli security? >> i think it absolutely should. what we saw even before the election here in the united states is that netanyahu has said time and again even in the face of critics that there has been no stronger ally to israel than the united states. the criticism kept comincoming, though. after this incident, i really do think the critics will be quieted. there's a lot of talk about how successful the iron dome program wus was. it deflected over 80% of the rockets th
. in egypt, we've seen huge protests against president mohamed morsi and the new powers he assumed just a day after the truce. he's insisting he's committed to democracy, but opponents are calling him a dictator it could be a complication for the cease-fire between israel and hamas negotiations moving forward. let's go to cnn's reza sayah in cairo. >> reporter: joe, the coming weeks here in egypt are going to be fascinating when it comes to politics. that's because there is an intensifying faceoff between egyptian president mohamed morsi and his opponents. outrage aimed at mr. morsi after the announcement of a number of controversial decrees earlier this week that give him sweeping powers. they make him at least temporarily the most powerful man in egypt. also seems to be an effort to push through the all-important drafting of the new constitution and putting in place the formation of egypt's new parliament want. one of the decrees bans anyone, even the judiciary, from appealing, overturning, questioning any decision mr. morsi has made since taking office in june. that order is to be set in p
.com/empoweredpatient. ♪ ♪ >>> outrage against egyptian president mohamed morsi this hour shows no sign of dying down. thousands of demonstrators are still in cairo's tahrir square, venting opposition to morsi's move, granting himself sweeping new powers. that triggered days of violent protests throughout the country. some critics claim morsi, who is egypt's first freely elected president is trying to establish a dictatorship. morsi is meeting today with the country's highest judicial authority in a bid to defuse this crisis. reza sayah is live in cairo. what's the situation right now? >> reporter: john, let's bring you up to speed. as we speak, egyptian president mohamed morsi meeting with egypt's top judges, seven of them representing the supreme judicial counsel. of course, the judges locking horns with mr. morsi right after one of his decrees essentially disabled them. so they're talking. we're going to see what the outcome of that meeting is. in the meantime, the leading factions, leading opposition factions continue to protest behind us in tahrir square. these factions that represent women's rights groups
-fire, the u.s. is trying to use every diplomatic contact it has from mohamed morsi, the president of egypt, to the prime minister of turkey, prime minister erdogan to get the cease-fire. i think that the interesting question, the one that really -- the administration would love to focus on in the next few weeks is how do you get to a more stable situation in gaza where israel doesn't have to periodically take out heavy weapons and threaten the ground assault. we don't know yet whether that will happen. and people are talking about lots of possibilities. again, the central change that would be most beneficial would be if the new egyptian government decided to really get involved and in effect take ownership of the problems in gaza as the closest backer, supporter, of hamas. and if that happened, you'd have a quite different situation and one that potentially would be a lot better for israel. >> rose: and where are the -- where are the turks and where are the emir of qatar on this issue? >> i think both the turks and the qatarrys are supportive in general but the people with real leverage ar
's why, mohamed morsi issued an order that says the courts may not overturn any of his decisions until the country drafts a new constitution. could give him some unchecked powers for months. morsi also ordered reviles of officials accused in last year's crack down on protesters. >>> new information about the david petraeus investigation. the fbi investigating whether he told his military staff to share documents and other sensitive information with his biographer and mistress paula broadwell. that's according to reports in "the washington post." fbi agents say they found low-level classified information on broadwell's computer. >>> interstate 10 in texas is back open friday after 120 people were hurt in an enormous wreck. take a look at that. about 100 vehicles were involved in a big chain reaction pileup that happened near beaumont. in one of the accidents a man and woman were killed when an 18 wheeler hit them from behind. authorities say dense fog might have been to blame. >>> sad news from the boxing world. doctors say that former champ hector macho camacho is clinically brain dead
calling their new president a dictator. mohamed morsi issued an order that says the courts may not overturn any of his decisions until the country drafts a new constitution. this could give him unchecked power for months. morsi has already ordered retrials of officials in last year's crackdown on protesters. that could mean another crackdown for hosni mubarak. >>> in about four hours' time michelle obama will welcome a christmas tree to the white house. you're having a look at last year's tree there. this year's is a 19 foot frasier fir. it will arrive at about 11:00 a.m. eastern from ashe county, north carolina. and it will be displayed in the blue room. >>> it was a triple serving of nfl football on thanksgiving day. it started in detroit as always. the texans had a 34-31 victory overover-the-lions. a gaffe by lions' coach jim schwartz on this play right here. the texans running back appeared down. still ran for a touchdown. now the coach of the lions threw the challenge flag here. but, it was negated, a negated automatic review because he threw the flag and it may have tosse
tomorrow after egypt's president, mohamed morsi, granted himself sweeping power over the country's judicial system. that sparked days of violent demonstrations and shook egypt's stock market which dropped nearly 10%. members of morsi's own government questioned the presidential decree, and several officials resigned because of it. but the administration says the move is necessary to keep supporters of former president hosni maubarak from blocking democratic reforms. morsi is expected to meet with senior judges today in an effort to stave off a wider crisis. >> this comes from a man who originally said they were never going to be involved in the government in the first place. >>> in syria where rebels say they've taken control of a key base near the capital of damascus. government forces, meanwhile, continue to target opposition forces with airstrikes. at least eight children were killed when one of those bombing runs had it tore through a village. rebel fighters are largely focusing their efforts on capturing air bases in an effort to ground the regime's warplanes and helicopters. still, fo
for this movement to let their blood be in vain. >> brown: meanwhile, the new islamist president of egypt mohamed morsi denounced the israelis. and his government asked the u.s. to press for an end to the offensive. but the obama administration lined up with the israelis. state department spokesman mark toner said the u.s. believes israel has the right to defend itself. >> our position is clear that there's no justification for the violence that hamas and other terrorist organizations are employing against isrl. and the onus is on them to cease their rocket attacks so that this de-escalation can take place. >> suarez: earlier, i spoke with the israeli ambassador to the united states michael oren to discuss the latest developments. ambassador, what's the latest from tel aviv? where the strikes accurate? have missiles actually hit the city and is anyone snurt >> thankfully nobody was hurt. the rockets struck in the greater tel aviv area. the alarms went off. the sirens, prime minister netanyahu was in the city at the time to a bomb shelter and now this simply means that 4.5 million israelis-- over
, forging new relations with rob morrison -- mohamed morsi, seeing how the arab world is post the arab spring. testing hezbollah and testing president obama, who interestingly immediately threw his lot in with israel. the president didn't say we want to call for cessation of hostilities and calm, he said we agree with israel's right to defend itself. israel's real enemy is iran. if remember netanyahu was at the u.n. holding up his bomb chart. he wasn't talking about hamas. he was talking about iran. that is israel's overriding threat. they have been able to deal with hamas pretty handedly. i've seen just yesterday israeli warships able to take out a single hamas militant who was sitting in a chair by the waterfront. so one warship fired a rocket. you could barely see the ship on the horizon and take out an individual militant. israel has been telephoning the houses of neighbors of hamas militants and telling them to get out of their houses. it has their phone numbers. so there is something suspicious about this. israel has too much intelligence on hamas, has been able to deal with hama
in the summit meetings then. from there, he spoke with benjamin netanyahu and mohamed morsi about ongoing fighting in ga gaza. and hostess isn't liquidating just yet. they'll be in mediation to work out differences. back to "hardball." >>> we're back. according to some reports, the president could name a successor to hillary clinton as early as next week. i think it could come this week. it's a decision fraught with risk. "the new york times" reported yesterday that the white house aides say the president's favored candidate is susan rice, the current ambassador to the u.n. but republicans like senator john mccain and lindsey graham have threatened to filibuster her nomination thanks to her appearances on tv following the benghazi attacks. would the president risk starting off his second term with a decision that would likely lead to a bitter confrontation fight? richard wolffe is vice president and executive editor of msnbc.com. he's also an msnbc political analyst. and jay newton-small is a diplomatic correspondent for "time." richard, i want to get your sense of the president's thinkin
on that specifically, but it doesn't seem there's a truce in place. earlier today you had egyptian president mohamed morsi saying there would be a deal tonight. even before this press conference we just wamp watched place. obviously that hasn't happened. two interesting things out of this press conference. you had secretary clinton talk about a durable solution that brings security and stability not just to israel, but to the region as a whole. you also heard prime minister netanyahu say that he is still open and would prefer a diplomatic solution, a real key sign that these negotiations are still ongoing. >> nbc's stephanie gosk, thanks so much, steph. stay with us. the day's "top lines" are coming up. >>> it's time for the "your business requests "entrepreneur of the week. christine osborne wants you to shop small. the owner of wonder works, a charleston, south carolina, based toy store believes in cooperation instead of competition. she has a section dedicated to locally made products to make sure that her customers' dollars stay local. for more, watch "your business" sunday mornings at 7:30 on m
a tremendous amount of financial backing, that everybody is watching this new leader, mohammed morsi to see hod see whose side he's on. >> i think he is in a really difficult situation. this is the first time in 40 years that egypt is governed by a very different group of guys. 40 years there's been a peace treaty between israel and egypt. now the nooyi egyptian leader, he's muslim brotherhood. guest what, his cousins are muslim brotherhood hamas. he has a very narrow line to walk. on the one hand if he looks like he's supporting the muslim brotherhood, hamas going up against israel he has to face the wrath of the united states and the pocketbook of the united states. if he doesn't look like he's supporting them he has his own islamist factions inside egypt who will say who needs i we could have had hosni mubarak for this type of reaction. martha: how is this going to play out? >> it remains to be seen. the israelis have gone through full mobilization, they are ready to om it's a costly thing in time and material and money, so for them to do this on a bluff, that is not happening. but they have
. on the level of politics, the election of president mohamed morsi was truly a landmark event in egypt's political history. he was the first civilian elected to the office of the presidency in egypt. he is also the first islamist to be elected as head of state in any arab country in free and fair elections. and that the islamist movement in question of course is the most impressive by far, the largest and most well-established islamist movement in the world of political islam. so truly momentous change on the level of politics. however, i would argue on the level of policy, we have much more durability, much more consistency. and the reasons for that are numerous, and a don't want to get too much into that, of course can discuss this in the q. and a session but just to point out that this is rooted in a number of factors. first of all, resiliency of egypt's institutions, the military and national security bureaucracy, a judiciary have all remained to a certain level very cohesive out what has been a very turbulent transition. now, all of these of course have afforded egypt really a mea
netanyahu and the newly elected president of egypt, which also makes this an interesting equation, mohamed morsi. let's call their relationships complicated. how does that affect the dialogue and possible negotiations moving forward? >> well, president obama and the entire american government have been unequivocal in terms of israel's right of self-defense. but what is also apparent is that our relationship, the american relationship with turkey, with prime minister is of great importance. also one of the things that can be extracted from this circumstance, while president morsi, the new egyptian president, is not like president mubarak, he still plays an extremely important role because of his ability, unique ability, to influence hamas hopefully in a more positive direction to create the dynamic for a sustained cease-fire. what's also important is that even though israel has engaged militarily in gaza, the egyptians under president morsi have not, at least to date, suggested that they would compromise their peace treaty with israel. which is a very important occurrence. now, if israel go
netanyahu of israel and president mohammed morsi of egypt. the main word they're using is de-escalate telling the two nations to scale back the violence but so far neither side is willing to cease-fire unless the other will bend to their demands. egypt does have a peace tree with israel which is why that country could be the key in putting a stop to the violence. more john fuglesang coming up after the break. stay with us. you're about to watch an viewer created ad message for little caesars who proudly salutes united states veterans everywhere. >> clarksville is a small town on the tennesse/kentucky boader and it is a really great place to raise a family. my name is lloyd allard i was a chief officer in the special forces, i was in the army for 23 years. i have made 1400 parachute jumps. well, my experience in the military was varied. i spent a lot of time in iraq, a lot of time in kuwait. i did two tours in iraq and i decided it was time to do something different with my life. i saw little caesars as a way to give something back to my family. the lit
to president mohamed morsi and the muslim brotherhood. and wondering if they replaced one dictator with another this morning. this ireport showing protesters as they carry the 16-year-old's casket through tahrir square yesterday. intense protests expected again today. morsi declaring egypt's courts cannot overturn decisions he's made since coming into office in june. or over the next six months. one opponent says that can only lead to a dictatorship. morsi has said he's trying to protect egypt's fragile arab spring revolution. he's not trying to accumulate unchecked power. >>> the body of former palestinian leader yasser arafat was exhumed this morning from a mausoleum in the west bank. a team of international scientists will analyze tissue samples in an attempt to determine if he was poisoned to death in 2004 with a radioactive substance. the actual cause of arafat's death was never actually determined. >>> the current head of the palestinian authority travels to the united nations this week for what he hopes will be a vote with a historic outcome. mahmoud abbas, will be present thursday as th
. that new government of mohamed morsi who himself is a member of the muslim brotherhood. there's a lot of sympathy in egypt for hamas. but on the other hand, egypt does want to play a constructive role because they know that they need the help of the united states, the help of the eu, the help of the international community for their economy. so it's a very delicate type of balance. hillary clinton knows the players. she's met several times with benjamin netanyahu. she's met with mahmud abbas, and she really knows the issues, so she's the perfect person to do it. >> jill, it is speculation, but it seems to me that the secretary of state would not be on her way to the middle east at this moment if a ground invasion were imminent. that is not a split-screen picture that the u.s. would like to see, no doubt. but as you said, a lot of what she'll be doing is working the allies. that's what the president's been doing, on the phone with turkey, egypt, countries in the region trying to stabilize the overall area. why is that? >> reporter: absolutely. secretary clinton has been making even mor
come of that. >> no good can come of that. let's talk about egypt. mohamed morsi who now runs egypt. he swept in after the arab spring, after the elections. we all celebrate that a tyrant is driven from power, even though that tyrant is one of the best allies that we've had in the middle east over the past 30 years. but it seems like the guy is now trying to seize ultimate power. >> well, look. i think, you know, and joe knows a lot more about this region than i ever will, but it seems like we are in a period, the arab spinning and what happened in egypt was going to unleash, actual democracy came to egypt, there was going to be a period of turmoil and instability. we're now seeing it, and managing that is going to be one of the paramount foreign policy challenges for this administration and probably the next couple of administrations as you have to deal with what it actually means to have a society that had ostensible democracy but nothing like real democracy for decades now in turmoil as real democracy and all of the forces that are set loose by that coming into play there. >> you kno
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)